The Chuuni Corner

Anime reviews, Chuunibyou, and other writings

Tag: Effects of Symbolism

Yuri Kuma Arashi and the Effects of Symbolism, Part 7

Love and sin go hand-in-hand

Love and sin go hand-in-hand

If you haven’t already, I highly suggest you head back to Part 6 and peruse the symbolism from episode eight. There we received symbolism that aided in characterizing Yuriika to the maximum, allowing us to see exactly why she has been going about targeting Kureha and Ginko for a good part of her life.

Today, we’ll be taking a look at just episode nine. This is a shorter part in the series for a reason: to highlight the masterful execution in the symbols shown and direction done by Ikuhara. Like episode six, what is presented is nothing less than amazing. It stands as one of the best episodes from the series, serving as a prime example of what symbolism can really do.

Day seven, let’s go.

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Yuri Kuma Arashi and the Effects of Symbolism, Part 6

Too many boxes to count

Too many boxes to count

If you haven’t already, I highly suggest you head back to Part 5 and peruse the symbolism from episode seven. Its talk about racism, religion, and remembrance is not only vastly interesting but wholly important for the rest of what the show has to offer.

Today, we’ll be going through just episode eight. This one continues with the idea of racism in a rather strange way, even for Yuri Kuma Arashi’s standards. Beyond that, and as becomes quite apparent, this is an episode dedicated to Yuriika: who she is, where she comes from, and most of all why she is acting the way that she is.

Day six, let’s go.

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Yuri Kuma Arashi and the Effects of Symbolism, Part 5

Stop the "Exclusion"

Stop the “Exclusion”

If you haven’t already, I highly suggest you head back to Part 4 and peruse the symbolism from episode six. It not only aides in switching the thematic focus from sexual discrimination to racism but is also an extraordinary look at what symbolism is capable of doing.

Today, we’ll be going through just episode seven. This episode gives us development for both Kureha and Ginko while simultaneously providing us with a better understanding of racism, religion, and remembrance. While not as strong as the previous episode, it still has a lot to say in regards to the underlying themes it presents.

Day five, let’s go.

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Yuri Kuma Arashi and the Effects of Symbolism, Part 4

Not even a Bear Flash can blind us from this symbolism

Not even a Bear Flash can blind us from this symbolism

If you haven’t already, I highly suggest you head back to Part 3 and peruse the symbols from episodes four and five. The former gives you a lot in regards to Lulu’s characterization and development while the latter does the same but for Ginko and Kureha. They’re important episodes – realistically, they all are – that help to let us, the audience, understand where the main players are coming from. So it’s vital that such motivations are understood before moving forward.

Today, we’ll be going only through episode six. This is one of the, if not the, strongest episode(s) in the series in terms of its symbolism, character development, narrative, direction, and overall execution. If you only read one part of my essay, I would be inclined to have you read this one; that is how masterfully done it is.

Day four, let’s go.

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Yuri Kuma Arashi and the Effects of Symbolism, Part 3

Time to cleanse both body and mind

Time to cleanse both body and mind

If you haven’t already, I highly suggest you head back to Part 2 and peruse the symbols from the first three episodes. They form the “basis” for what is going on within the anime and act as the world building for everything that is to come.

Today, we’ll be going through just episodes four and five. Episode four follows Lulu, now one of my favorite characters in the medium. She’s arguably the strongest the show has to offer, and her backstory not only helps to develop her person but also provides us with our first true look at what love is and what such a feeling really means.

Episode five follows Ginko’s failed attempts at getting Kureha to notice her. Here, the symbolism works at making such an idea known while simultaneously characterizing both Ginko and Kureha in the process. Once again, there is a lot to get through, but I hope that something within manages to be enlightening!

Day three, let’s go.

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Yuri Kuma Arashi and the Effects of Symbolism, Part 2

Court is in session

Court is in session

If you haven’t already, I highly suggest you start with Part 1 to familiarize yourself with all that is the very complex device known as symbolism.

This time, we’ll be taking a look at what exactly the show is trying to convey, what the majority of the essay will consist of until near the last few parts, and break down the first three episodes. There are actually a lot more symbols going on in these opening episodes, but we cannot fully look at them until much later. So while it may not seem like there is much to dissect, trust me, there is a lot to get through!

Day two, let’s go.

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Yuri Kuma Arashi and the Effects of Symbolism, Part 1

What is symbolism?

What is symbolism?

An Introduction

Winter 2015 brought us the typical anime offerings of harems, slice-of-lives, and comedies. But among the rough, there shined a rather peculiar diamond: Yuri Kuma Arashi. Sadly, many people had foregone the show for a variety of reasons. One, it defines the phrase “completely insane.” Its premise is just too crazy for many people to swallow. Two, is the show’s use of lesbianism. Again, some people refuse to accept such a development. And three – by far the largest reason for people ignoring the anime – is the use of symbolism. Each of these will be addressed in my later review, but my analysis here will be focusing on the third.

What follows is my attempt at accomplishing three goals: explaining the idea of symbolism and its uses, conveying and interpreting Yuri Kuma Arashi’s symbols, and how they connect to the messages, ideas, and motifs it presents. Hopefully by the end of my entire piece, you’ll not only have a greater understanding of the variety and effectiveness of symbols – which you can use throughout your own anime-watching career – but also a greater appreciation of “Lesbian Bear Storm” and everything it has to offer.

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